Google launches Music Store and opens Google Music to all

Google has taken the beta tag off of Google Music and has made it available to everyone. At their special Los Angeles event today, which was streamed live at Youtube.com/Android, Google did what we all expected them to do: they announced the music store, and more.

Google Music allows you to upload your music library to the cloud (up to 20,000 songs) free of charge. Once your library is uploaded, you can then listen to your music anywhere on your phone, tablet, or computer via music.google.com. Your library is always synced, so when you add a playlist from your computer, it’s available on your phone, and so on.

Music Store

With the new Google Music store that was introduced, you will now be able to purchase individual songs and albums directly from Google. This is a feature that the service was lacking when it was launched back in May at Google I/O.

The Music Store has over 13 million tracks from artists on Sony Music Entertainment, EMI, Universal Music Group, global independent rights agency Merlin, and from over 1,000 independent record labels such as Merge Records, Warp Records, and Matador Records.

The music store allows you to purchase individual tracks or entire albums, the choice is yours. Tracks can be purchased online at market.android.com/music or directly from your Android device

Music sharing

Now that Google has its own social network, Google Plus, it’s a no brainer that they implemented some sort of social sharing aspect into the music store. With every purchase that you make, you will have the ability to share your songs. Your friends will then have the ability to listen to the complete song.

Exclusive Content

To launch the new service, Google is offering a bunch of exclusive and free content. They have partnered with many well-known artists and bands to help you get your Music collection started (if you don’t have one already), and to help you discover new music. I just discovered Shakira’s new Je L’aime A Mourir!

Check out all the exclusive and free content being offered by Google and the artists below.

  • The Rolling Stones are offering an exclusive, never-before-released live concert album, Brussels Affair (Live, 1973), including a free single, “Dancing with Mr. D.” This is the first of six in an unreleased concert series that will be made available exclusively through Google Music over the coming months.
  • Coldplay fans will find some original music that’s not available anywhere else: a free, live recording of “Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall“, a five-track live EP from their recent concert in Madrid and a remix of “Paradise” by Tiësto.
  • Busta Rhymes‘s first single from his upcoming album, Why Stop Now (feat. Chris Brown), is available for free.
  • Shakira‘s live EP from her recent concert in Paris and her new studio single, “Je L’Aime à Mourir” are both being offered up free.
  • Pearl Jam are releasing a live album from their 9/11/11 concert in Toronto, free to Google Music users.
  • Dave Matthews Band are offering up free albums from two live concerts, including new material from Live On Lakeside.
  • Tiësto is offering up a new mix, “What Can We Do?” (feat. Anastacia), exclusively to Google Music users.

If you’re a T-Mobile customer, T-Mobile will also be offering you some exclusive music. You will also be able to buy songs and have them charged directly to your T-Mobile bill, an option known as carrier billing.

Artist Hub

If you’re an independent artist, Google Music offers a place where you can sell your music in the Artist Hub. The Artist Hub allows you price your music, create your artist page, and allow your fans to purchase music directly from you! For more information on the Artist Hub, visit music.google.com/artists.

Availability

Google Music is currently live at music.google.com. The music store is currently online at market.android.com. In the next few days, an updated version of the Android Market that has support for the music store will be pushed out to Android devices.



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Jonathan converted to the Android platform from Blackberry with the original Motorola Droid. He currently has a Samsung Galaxy Nexus complete with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean on Verizon Wireless, a Motorola Xoom, and a Kindle Fire. Besides keeping up with Android news, he enjoys spending time with his family, gaming, reading, and computers. Google+

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