Another reason Google Wallet will rock: NFC-enabled residential locks

Instead of using your smartphone and Google Wallet to just pay for things, you could possibly use it in the future to unlock your front door. That’s right, Google’s vision with Google Wallet isn’t just to pay for things, it’s to eventually enable you to carry everything inside your wallet on your phone.

While most people don’t store keys in their wallet, the Google Wallet app (or any NFC-enabled smartphone) could take advantage of Yale Locks and Hardware’s new NFC-enabled residential locks. The NFC residential locks from YLH allow you to unlock your home’s door by simply placing your NFC smartphone next to the lock. No keys to fumble with, simply wave your phone.

I think that this is brilliant idea and often wonder why NFC technology has taken so long to be adopted in the US. Assa Abloy, the parent company of Yale already has NFC-based doors and locks in some Swedish hotel. In Asia, the technology is used almost everywhere.

Pricing and availability wasn’t mentioned. Hopefully, these new locks won’t cost an arm and a leg.

Check out the video of the Yale NFC Residential Lock and also read the full press release below.



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Yale Debuts First NFC Door Lock for Homes

Near Field Communication (NFC) employs Mobile Keys platform from parent company Assa Abloy.

LENOIR CITY, TN — Yale Locks & Hardware (http://www.yalelocks.com), an ASSA ABLOY Group company and a world leader in door hardware for residential and commercial applications, will demonstrate a version of its Yale Real Living locks with Near Field Communication (NFC) technology. The demonstration will take place at the upcoming CEDIA Expo 2011, September 7-10 in Indianapolis, IN.

The Yale Real Living line is the company’s first locks specifically designed to integrate seamlessly into the digital home.

In adding NFC capability, Yale expects to be the first US brand to offer residential locks with NFC capability. What’s more, this Yale Real Living line will be compatible with the ASSA ABLOY Mobile Keys platform. A scalable secure delivery infrastructure for distribution and management of mobile keys, the ASSA ABLOY Mobile Keys platform allows credentials to be distributed securely through NFC-enabled mobile phones as an alternative to mechanical keys and physical access cards. Consequently, this will be the first line of residential locks that can be unlocked directly using an NFC-enabled mobile phone.

NFC is a short-range wireless communication technology standard that enables the exchange of data between devices up to a 10-centimeter distance. Applications include contactless transactions such as payment and transit ticketing, keys, data transfers including electronic business cards, and access to online digital content.

The mobile keys platform enabled by the NFC technology has already been introduced to the hospitality industry by Yale’s parent company, ASSA ABLOY. In fact, ASSA ABLOY recently completed the first-ever trial of the mobile keys platform at the Clarion Hotel in Stockholm, in which 28 frequent hotel guests were invited to use the technology over an eight-month period. Reaction to the mobile keys platform was overwhelmingly positive.

“From a residential perspective, the mobile phone is ubiquitous,” said Jason Williams, General Manager of Yale Residential. “We use it to make reservations, schedule our day, everything. By incorporating NFC technology into our Yale Real Living locks, we’ve extended the functionality of the mobile phone even further. What’s more, we’ve created a highly secure product that capitalizes on ASSA ABLOY technology that is being extremely well-received in other end-user markets.”

Available with either a sleek capacitive touchscreen or pushbutton key pad, Yale’s new platform of intelligent locks supports both Z-Wave┬« and ZigBee, allowing them to integrate seamlessly into a wide range of home control and security systems, including Control4, the Vera Z-Wave home control system by Mi Casa Verde, and Alarm.com’s emPower, among others.

Source: CEPro via Engadget